Misinformation about COVID-19

As a Registered Nurse, I am making an appeal to all of my readers to utilize the only two reliable sources for accurate information on the coronavirus.

  1. World Health Organization https://www.who.int/tro
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention https://www.cdc.gov/

The link below is a story on the most common ways the coronavirus is transmitted by Jenna Birch, a writer for HUFFPOST. What are Jenna’s credentials beyond reporting this story, and does this information agree with the CDC and WHO’s standing on how the coronavirus is transmitted?

https://www.aol.com/article/lifestyle/2020/03/25/the-most-common-ways-the-coronavirus-is-transmitted/23961361/

In this paragraph, she uses the name of a well-known professional Medical Journal to make her article appear credible.

According to new research published in The New England Journal of Medicine, scientists were able to show that aerosolized (that is, airborne) particles could spread the novel coronavirus. This means there’s possible airborne transmission of the illness, at least in certain settings.

When I followed the hyperlink, new research, the following disclaimer was stated by the Authors of their correspondence that was sent to The New England Journal of Medicine. The medical team who conducted their research is submitting a hypothesis, findings, and conclusions based on their clinical experiments alone.

Even this Medical team admits that their findings do not represent that of the CDC.

The findings and conclusions in this letter are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

The first article from the HuffPost contained the following misinformation:

CORRECTION: A previous version of this article stated aerosolized blood particles can be a transmitter of the virus. While researchers have discovered small amounts of COVID-19 in blood samples among a few severely ill patients, the amount is too low to suggest there can be blood-related transmission at this time.

Although this second article appears to contain some accurate information…there is no need for the public to read data that is interpreted by unlicensed individuals who copy and paste the information to gain readers. Where are her references for the information in the remainder of the article?

Please get your information first hand from the only two reliable sources: CDC and WHO. Their websites are updated once per day.

  1. Keep your distance.
  2. Wash your hands with soap and water for 20 seconds.
  3. Using hand sanitizer is secondary and should be used when you do not have access to water and soap.
  4. Build your immunity by eating and cooking plenty of fresh fruits and veggies.

Pray, and have the faith to believe that when we do our part, God will take care of us as He promised.

Sonya Johnson Ruiz RN

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Author: steps2successwithsolutions

By profession, I am a Registered Nurse, with a passion for helping others overcome the obstacles in their lives. I am a writer of Devotionals, Romantic Poetry, and Research Articles. The recent development of Mentoring and launching as a Motivational Speaker has prompted me to address real-life issues for women from a spiritual perspective.